Monday, September 22, 2014

Trucker's Hitch and Water Knot

Mike Barter, the video-savvy Canadian guide, has a new video that describes a couple of knots. In this piece he covers the trucker's hitch and the water knot.

Check out the video below:



After re-posting a lot of these videos, I've started to notice that Mike is a bit gun-shy. I get the impression that a lot of people are giving him negative feedback on some of his content...which is too bad. He's making some very good instructional videos.

So instead of negative feedback, I'd just like to make a couple of additional notes.

First, I'd like to reiterate the fact that the trucker's hitch is primarily for tents and tying things down. It doesn't have an application in climbing proper.

And second, I'd also like to note that the biggest danger of the water knot (also known as the ring bend) is cyclic loading. In other words, weighting and unweighting the knot can cause the tails to slowly work out. You can occasionally see this at rap stations with old webbing. As such, it is very important that there is plenty of tail when you tie the knot and that you always check rap stations closely.

--Jason D. Martin

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Weekend Warrior - Videos to get you STOKED!!!

There are more than just "Pretty Faces" in this first video this weekend.  This new trailer from Unicorn Picnic shows some ladies who know how to rip!


Unicorn Picnic | Pretty Faces Teaser from Unicorn Picnic Productions on Vimeo.


Jeremy Jones' "Higher" was shown in Seattle on the 18th, and unfortunately I wasn't able to make it to the event. Hopefully I'll be able to catch it during Banff or some other tour. In the meantime, I'll have to suffice with just this awesome trailer.



Caroline George gives us some good insight on balancing her life as climber, guide, and mom in this next video.



In our last video, we get another look at a climber who is sharing his time between his family and the mountains.  With a full-time "regular" job, and also numerous first ascents, Jason Haas is the epitome of a Weekend Warrior.



Have a great weekend! - James

Friday, September 19, 2014

Carabiners and Damage to Ropes

We all know that we should always use the same end of the quickdraw for the rope. While the other end should always be used for bolt. The reasoning behind this is that the bolt-end of the carabiner gets damaged every time you take a fall on it, and that damage can have a serious impact on the life of your rope, and maybe even your safety.

The good folks at DMM have put together a nice video on this topic. Check it out, below:

video

A very similar issue takes place when draws are fixed permanently on sport routes. Draws are generally only affixed to routes that are very hard where the climbers working the routes tend to take a lot of falls. Eventually, the rope ends of the carabiners begin to get worn down by the ropes running through them and can create sharp edges.

The take-away here is not just to pay attention to where  you are using your carabiners, but also to constantly check your gear. Look for damage on the carabiners that could lead to rope damage. And look for damage in the rope that could lead to failure...

Jason D. Martin

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Climbing and Outdoor News from Here and Abroad - 9/18/14

Northwest:

NOTE - With the information below, there have been three rappelling accidents that lead to fatalities in the Pacific Northwest in the last three weeks. While we don't have all the details, most rappelling accidents can be avoided by using an autoblock and tying knots in the end of the rappel ropes... Be careful out there.

--The body of an experienced climber from the North Bend area was found Wednesday at Mount Garfield, where he fell to his death while climbing with a partner, the King County Sheriff’s Office said. The climber fell from the Infinite Bliss route and it is likely that his fall was related to some kind of rappelling mistake. To read more, click here and here.

--In related news, there was a serious rockfall incident on Mt. Garfield and some of the anchor bolts were hit by debris. To read more, click here.

--A climber from Everett was killed in a rappelling accident in the North Cascades, according to the Okanogan Sheriff’s Office. The climber was reportedly on the "La Petit Cheval" route on the Spontaneity Arete. To read more, click here.

--There was also a rescue on Chair Peak this week. According to this report, there were no serious injuries, but you can see a video of the rescue, here.

--A grim discovery awaited Adam Cox and his fiancé when they returned to their car on Aug.29 at the Hannegan Pass trailhead after hiking on Mount Baker for 5 days. Their vehicle had been broken into, the cables to the battery had been cut and a backpack with their wallets, keys and a cellphone was missing. ​To make matters even more nightmarish when Cox called Seattle PD to have them check on his residence at the 2600 block of 47 Ave. S.W., they discovered that the thieves had driven the 3 hours from Mount Baker and broken into the couple’s home. To read more, click here.


--The Five Point Film Festival will be coming to Bellingham on Saturday. Click on the poster above for details.

--Here are some fun pictures of a woman ice climbing on Mt. Baker in a dress...

--Free Soloist Alex Honnold recently made the first free solo ascent of the University Wall route in Squamish. To read more, click here.

Sierra:

--On Tuesday, September 16, Park Rangers from Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks participated in the successful rescue of a 67-year old man from San Jose whose plane crashed in a remote area of Sequoia National Park. The plane was reported missing when it failed to arrive as scheduled in Lone Pine, CA, on Monday afternoon. To read more, click here.

Desert Southwest:

--The former superintendent of Joshua Tree National Park wrote an editorial for the Desert Sun newspaper. Mark Butler is concerned that the new solar project in the area will have adverse effects on the Park's views and wildlife. To read more, click here.

Colorado:

--An injured climber has been airlifted from K-2 Peak southwest of Aspen, but no information on the climber's condition has been released. To read more, click here.

Colorado Gubernatorial Candidate would like to seize all 
federal public lands in Colorado and claim them for the state.

--In the first debate of the Colorado gubernatorial race last Friday, Republican nominee Bob Beauprez went on the record supporting the seizure of Colorado’s national parks, forests and public lands by the state government, saying “this is fight we have to wage.” In a video taken by American Bridge, Beauprez, who is challenging incumbent Governor John Hickenlooper (D), claimed that all public land in the state was “supposed to be Colorado’s” and that “if this were private land and the federal government was a tenant, we would cancel their lease.” To read more, click here.

Notes from All Over:

--The Access Fund is pleased to announce that it has awarded over $16,912 in the second round of the 2014 Climbing Preservation Grants Program. Each year, the Access Fund awards up to $40,000 in grant money to local climbing communities with worthy projects that preserve or enhance climbing access. The Access Fund Climbing Preservation Grants Program is an example of membership dollars at work in local climbing communities across the country. To read about who received the grants, click here.

--Canadians Crosby Johnston, Joshua Lavigne and Tony Richardson made a first ascent on Canada's Baffin Island on the Beluga Spire. To read more, click here. 

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Gourmet Backcountry Food for Backpacking

AAI Backpacking guide Jeff Ries has a great advantage over our mountaineering guides. If you take out your rope and your harness and your pickets and your cams, suddenly your pack is a lot lighter. Some might argue that perhaps that weight shouldn't go completely away. Perhaps it should be replaced with food. Really good food.

Jeff has been cooking gourmet food on his backpacking trips over the last few years and has put together the following blog about how to eat really well in the mountains. Yeah, it might be a little bit on the heavy side...and if you're looking to lighten up then this won't be for you. But if you're okay with carrying a little extra and want to eat well, then check it out...
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Before leaving the trailhead, I like to have everyone enjoy the option of a treat from a nice bakery and offer everyone a scone or something similar. On the hike in on the first day I offer grapes and bing cherries at the first rest stop. They are a bit heavy to carry further but the water and sugar content are both well appreciated.

A good first lunch is some fruit and pastries, rather than a larger meal that could slow strenuous activity. I prefer eating a little around 11am and a little more around 2pm, so I offer snacks like fruit, gorp and energy bars. Gourmet crackers with flavored cream cheese, like Laughing Cow products work well.

It doesn't take as much effort to carry a little more weight to the first camp, I splurge a bit with beef stroganoff on the first evening. I grill some fillet mignon medium rare a couple days before the trip; it will cook the rest of the way just before it is served. Then I cut it up into 1 inch cubes and freeze it. It will keep other foods cold on the hike in. I cook a stroganoff noodle mix and then add fresh sour cream, a little white wine and then the fillet mignon. The rest of the wine is served with or before the meal. If it is cold and rainy, I also serve soup. If it is hot and the climb has been tough, it is a good time for Frito's or baby carrots dipped in french onion dip (made with the rest of the sour cream). Variations I have used for the first evening include grilled salmon instead of fillet mignon and apple slices dipped in carmel dip as the appetizer.

For the next morning, eggs and hash browns work well, especially with some tomatoes. I always have some flavored oatmeal for people who don't like to eat eggs. A little ham and/or cheese is nice to put in the eggs. I boil some water for tea, coffee or hot chocolate before the main course.

The second lunch is a good time for fresh fruit; apples or oranges. I also like to provide some quality dinner rolls or flavored bread (last trip the bakery had spinach feta) with some flavored cheese spread.

Dinner on the second night is a good time for ham as it keeps well for 2 days and a night (as long as temperatures are not too hot). I serve soup if it as cold and cold beer if it is hot. If I have a campfire, I wrap some potatoes in foil and put them in or by the fire while cooking fresh broccoli. If there is no campfire, I slice the potatoes and boil them. Chocolate covered blueberries make a great dessert.

The rest of the trip breakfasts offer a choice of precooked Mountain House scrambled eggs with bacon (sometimes with potatoes - the skillet selection), flavored oatmeal, granola and of course coffee/tea/hot chocolate.

Lunch on the third day includes flavored wheat thins with extra sharp cheese and salami. If there is any fresh fruit left over, we finish it up today.

The third night's dinner is time for something that keeps well for a few days. I prefer precooked flavored chicken breasts in a foil pouch, available at some grocery stores. I serve them with instant flavored potatoes and baby carrots. Chocolate covered espresso beans are a hit with the coffee drinkers.

Beef steak nuggets, Bakers breakfast cookies and dried fruit (different types) make great lunches an later days of a trip. Bagels and cream cheese also keeps well. Soup is always nice when it is cold and stopping for a long lunch, I sometimes build a campfire to warm bodies and dry clothing.

For dinner on the fourth and subsequent nights, I offer a variety of Mountain House brand freeze dried dinners. I want the backpackers to try different entrees so I bring several 2 serving choices. If anyone is still hungry after emptying the foil pouch in which it cooks, I add an envelope of instant potatoes and the appropriate amount of boiling water to make sure everyone has had enough. This keeps dish cleaning to a minimum as there are no dishes to clean these nights.

--Jeff Ries, AAI Backpacking Guide

Monday, September 15, 2014

Film Review: Vertical Frontier

Mount Everest is deeply embedded in the minds of climbers and non-climbers alike all over the world. People think about it constantly.  We hear it all the time: "what do I need to do to climb Everest?"

Mount Everest is the highest mountain in the world. But that's not what's made it such a household name. No, instead, it was the countless books and documentaries that have been produced over the years describing the gruesome details of expeditions gone wrong, and the heroic efforts of climbers on successful ascents. Popular culture lore helped to create the Everest that exists in our minds...


And while there are other mountains that the collective climbing psyche is fixated on, there are few that have seen so many popular culture references. And fewer yet that have hundreds of documentary films chronicling the tales on their flanks.  Mount Everest is an international household name.  It was the scene of many heroic alpine struggles...but there are other places that deserve such an honor.  One of those places is Yosemite Valley.

Like Mount Everest, Yosemite holds an important place in the history of climbing. It is where modern rock climbing evolved the furthest, the fastest.  And it is a place where technical skill and big wall proficiency is still at the cutting edge.  One great difference between Mount Everest and Yosemite is the fact that there simply have not been as many popular culture explorations of the place and its history to climbers.

Vertical Frontier, subtitled, "A History of the Art, Sport and Philosophy of Rock Climbing in Yosemite," is a Mount Everest style documentary built for the masses.  But unlike many of the Everest documentaries, Vertical Frontier caters to climbers as well as to non-climbers, making it one of the rare films that is entertaining to both audiences.

Vertical Frontier is a slick PBS-style feature documentary narrated by Tom Brokaw that tells the story of climbing in Yosemite from the first forays onto big features in the 1800s to a battle between climbers and the National Park Service at the turn of the century.  In between these two bookends, the film follows the development of climbing skill and technique by chronicling the important ascents over the last 100 years.

Much of the film is done in a standard documentary format; a format that easily allows the filmmakers to tell the story. And though engaging, climbing history is fraught with emotion and one-upsmanship. This, unfortunately, doesn't always penetrate the documentary style.

The capstone of Yosemite's story in the film is the "coming-together" of climbers after a flood seriously impacted the valley's tourist infrastructure in 1997. The National Park Service proposed a change in Camp 4, the campground used by generations of Yosemite Climbers. They wanted to build a new lodge at the historic site.  The last minutes of the film are quite different from the rest, as they are filled with emotion as decades worth of climbers pull together to save the place that provided them with such inspiration.

This 2002 documentary won the "Best Film on Climbing" at the Banff Mountain Film Festival in 2002 and at the Kendall Mountain Film Festival in 2003. The film won first prize in the Mountaineering Category at the International Mountaineering Film Festival at Teplice nad Metuii in the Czech Republic in 2004.  Additionally, it won the "Viewer's Choice" award at the International Festival of Outdoor Films in 2004 and the "Best Cameraman" at the Tbilisi International Mountain Films Festival in Georgia in 2006. It may be one of the better-awarded documentaries of its type...


Many of the films we see on Youtube or at the Banff Film Festival today are about people pushing standards. They are often slickly produced and are extremely entertaining. But they don't usually give us a glimpse into what came before the climbers on screen demonstrating their acrobatic skills.  Vertical Frontier provides this and is extremely entertaining for it...

--Jason D. Martin

Friday, September 12, 2014

Sprained Ankles: Don't Do More Damage by Rushing Recovery

Ankle sprains are among the most common injuries, and unfortunately, they are more often than not, not well cared for. An article by health writer Jane Brody in the New York Times explains the dangers of not taking really good care of even a minor sprain.

She writes: “A sprained ankle is one of the most common joint injuries, prompting many people to consider it 'just a sprain' and not treat it with the respect it deserves. The too-common consequence of this neglect is a lasting weakness, an unstable joint and repeated sprains.
Given that some 25,000 ankle sprains occur each day in the United States, it is worth knowing how they can be prevented and how they should be treated.”

Under treatment means that 30 to 40 percent of people with simple ankle sprains develop chronic long-term joint pathology.

Experts say that after a sprain the ankle should be immediately immobilized to protect the joint and allow the injured ligaments to heal: at least a week for the simplest sprain, 10 to 14 days for a moderate sprain and four to six weeks for more severe sprains.

You can’t simply use pain as a guideline, because often times pains eases up or goes away in cases in which there is still a lot of ligament healing to be done.

Brody writes, “As with other such injuries, the recommended first aid for an ankle sprain, to be started as soon as possible after the injury, goes by the acronym
RICE:

R – for rest,
I – for ice,
C – for compression,
E – for elevation.

In other words, get off the foot, wrap it in an Ace-type bandage, raise it higher than the heart and ice it with a cloth-wrapped ice pack applied for 20 minutes once every hour (longer application can cause tissue damage). This should soon be followed by a visit to a doctor, physical therapist or professional trainer, who should prescribe a period of immobilization of the ankle and rehabilitation exercises. An anti-inflammatory drug may be recommended and crutches provided for a few days, especially if the ankle is too painful to bear weight.”

See her article for more details on care and healing:
http://tinyurl.com/mhj8oj

Brody writes on health every Tuesday in the NYT’s Science Times section.

Dunham Gooding